Posts Tagged ‘horse’

 

Dr. Juliet Getty Speaks on Equine Nutrition on Monty Roberts’ Horsemanship Radio

Wednesday, January 16th, 2019

Can we keep a horse healthy in our restricted forage environment of barns and stalls? Horse’s bodies actually adjust with seasons. Colic, ulcers and laminitis are man-made, but we can prevent them with careful management. 

Dr. Juliet Getty, internationally respected equine nutritionist, shares tips about these topics and more on the award winning Horsemanship Radio. Her recent interview with the show’s host, Monty Roberts’ daughter, Debbie Roberts Loucks, can be heard at http://www.horsemanshipradio.com/2019/01/14/127-by-omega-fields-getty-on-forage-seasoned-rider-magazine/ where she emphasizes how respecting the power of the horse’s instincts can provide a lifetime of health and vitality.   

Check out Episode #127 at minute marker 37.37 to enjoy this 30 minute discussion.  Horsemanship Radio is dedicated to the exploration of good horsemanship throughout the world, offering tips and interviews that explore good horsemanship.

Interviews are also archived at www.gettyequinenutrition.com.

 

Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. is an independent equine nutritionist with a wide U.S. and international following. Her research-based approach optimizes equine health by aligning physiology and instincts with correct feeding and nutrition practices. Dr. Getty’s goal is to empower the horseperson with the confidence and knowledge to provide the best nutrition for his or her horse’s needs.

Dr. Getty’s fundamental resource book, Feed Your Horse Like a Horse, is available in paperback as well as in hardcover and Kindle versions. All except the Kindle version are available at www.GettyEquineNutrition.com— buy the book there and have it inscribed by the author. Print and Kindle versions are also available at Amazon (www.Amazon.com); find print versions at other online retail bookstores. The seven individual volumes in Dr. Getty’s topic-centered “Spotlight on Equine Nutrition” series are available with special package pricing at her website, and also at Amazon in print and Kindle versions. Dr. Getty’s books make ideal gifts for equestrians!

Find a world of useful information for the horseperson at www.GettyEquineNutrition.com: Sign up for Dr. Getty’s informative, free e-newsletter, Forage for Thought; browse her library of articles and tips; listen to recorded interviews; and purchase recordings of her educational teleseminars and webinars.

Find a variety of quality supplements and whole foods at her online Free Shipping Supplement Store[i]. Reach Dr. Getty directly at gettyequinenutrition@gmail.com.

[i] http://horsesupplements.gettyequinenutrition.biz

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 16, 2019

www.gettyequinenutrition.com

 

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Monty Roberts’ New Series on Horses That Fear Spray Bottles

Monday, December 31st, 2018

December 31, 2018 Solvang, California: Monty Roberts is the ultimate horse behaviorist. Whether the issue is how to encourage a horse to want to do something, or conversely how to overcome a remedial issue, Monty is called upon by some of the greatest horse persons on earth to help.

Sometimes a horse has lived with a fear issue most of his life. Roberts believes that this is just not fair to the horse, especially if there is an opportunity to overcome that fear.

One of the most common phobias amongst horses are the hissing spray bottles spurting strange smelling liquid in the direction of the horse’s body. If you imagine this from the horse’s viewpoint, it makes sense that the neophobic equine has a problem tolerating this scary moment. Monty tackles this chronic issue in the way he has become famous for: simplicity, common sense and quite a few incremental steps, to be fair to the horse.

In this series Monty starts by using a gentle gelding as a guide in Part 1: Horses Can Learn Through Observation https://montyrobertsuniversity.com/training/2031189169

Part 2: Step by Step Spray Bottle Training

“Show the horse that there is no pain connected to the water spray.” says Monty Roberts.

Part 3: Where to Stand When You Spray Your Horse, demonstrates the steps to habituate the comfortable place a horse finds to overcome his fears of the spray bottle.

“I never stop learning,” says Roberts. “And I don’t want any of my students to stop learning either! I want all of them to be much better than me. We are just scratching the surface of knowing how much horses can teach us.”

Launched in 2009, Monty Roberts and his team developed the first of its kind Equus Online University; an interactive online lesson site that is considered the most effective educational tool for horsemen on the web.  It is established now that this learning system is the most comprehensive globally in horsemanship. It was important to Roberts not only to quantify the language of the horses he calls Equus, but also to share its interpretation with lessons from world renowned horse persons such as Stefan Peters and Jan Ebeling from dressage, Will Simpson from Olympic jumping and Phillip Ralls and Richard Winters from Western Reining.

Since launching, Monty Roberts and many legendary trainers have contributed their knowledge of horsemanship. “Considered a rosetta stone for horse communication, one of gestures like signing for the deaf, online lessons are available 24/7 have contributed greatly to the encouragement and study of non-violent training of horses.” said Roberts. He wants the global impact to spread in his lifetime and encourages interested persons to log on at http://montyrobertsuniversity.com/library and have a free look around.

When Monty Roberts was invited by Queen Elizabeth II in 1989 to demonstrate his understanding of horsemanship, horse training’s 6000 year old tradition was forever changed. Roberts had cracked the code on the communication system horses used to survive for millions of years before humans had domesticated them. Roberts demonstrated concepts that drew a line at pain in training and his life’s goal is to leave the world a better place for horses and for people, too.

Debbie Roberts Loucks, Monty’s daughter, spearheaded the development, “We are first and foremost advocates for keeping horses in people’s lives. The more than 500 video lessons are in categories of Ground Work, from foundational to Advanced, and Ridden Work, from foundational to problem solving. And there is a terrific forum plus a searchable data base of over 600 Questions and Answers from Monty with a handy search bar.”

In 1948 while laying on his belly watching wild mustangs through binoculars in the Nevada desert, the 13-year-old Monty Roberts couldn’t imagine that what he was discovering about horses he would share nearly 70 years later online.

Queen Elizabeth clearly wanted the best for her horses. Whether they were Thoroughbred racehorses, military horses, carriage horses or simply horses she loved to ride, Her Majesty wanted them trained in the most respectful manner possible. The Queen endorsed Monty’s concepts of training horses without violence, causing them to rise to the highest degree of proficiency in their given discipline with the lowest possible stress.

Her Majesty observed five days of Roberts’ causing young horses to accept their first saddle and rider in about 30 minutes. It was then that the Queen requested a book about who Monty Roberts was and why he chose to reverse what had been the traditional ‘breaking’ procedures for 6,000 years. The publishers suggested the book would sell 3,000 to 5,000 copies, but, in fact, Her Majesty watched as Roberts’ first literary challenge reach six and a half million copies.

It has been with the Queen’s encouragement that Monty Roberts has now toured the world demonstrating his principles. In 44 countries Roberts has presented his audiences with over 11,000 horses. About 25 percent have been totally untrained, while 50 percent have been severely beset by behavioral problems. The remaining 25 percent simply refused to load in a trailer or truck used for transportation. All of these were successful in overcoming their given problem.

While tracking wild mustangs in Nevada as a boy, Roberts observed a nonverbal communication between the horses, a silent language he would later call ‘Equus’. Roberts incorporates Equus into his nonviolent training approach called Join-Up®. Roberts first developed Join-Up to help teach horsemen how to stop the cycle of violence typically accepted in traditional horse breaking. Roberts created a consistent set of principles using the horse’s inherent methods of communication and herd behavior.

The result is a willing partnership in which the horse’s performance can flourish to its full potential, rather than exist within the boundaries of obedience. These principles are valuable tools to understanding what motivates horse behavior and increasing effectiveness in any application. Join-Up training methods are most simply expressed in the process of starting raw horses. Without the use of pain or force, the trainer persuades a raw horse to accept a saddle and rider in less than 30 minutes.

Monty Roberts has discovered that these principles are effective as a tool for dealing with many stress-related issues of the human mind. Roberts believes that PTSD is not, in fact, a disorder, but an injury. He states that it should be PTSI. His belief is that injuries heal and most people believe that disorders are challenges that do not tend to heal. Disorders require other forms of dealing with disorders of the human.

With these beliefs in place Roberts has been working with military veterans and first responders in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. More than 1,000 individuals have experienced the engagement of horses in the process of dealing with post-traumatic stress injury. The results of these clinics have been overwhelmingly successful and are gaining momentum throughout the areas where Roberts has conducted his clinics.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Debbie Loucks

Monty and Pat Roberts, Inc./Join-Up® International

(949) 632-1856

debbie@montyroberts.com

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Photos available upon request

MONTY ROBERTS first gained widespread fame with the release of his New York Times Best Selling book, The Man Who Listens To Horses; a chronicle of his life and development of his non-violent horse training methods called Join-Up®. Monty grew up on a working horse farm as a firsthand witness to traditional, often violent methods of horse training and breaking the spirit with an abusive hand. Rejecting that, he went on to win nine world’s championships in the show ring. Today, Monty’s goal is to share his message that “Violence is never the answer.” Roberts has been encouraged by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II with the award of the Membership in The Royal Victorian Order, as well as becoming Patron of Join-Up International. Other honors received were the ASPCA “Founders” award and the MSPCA George T. Angell Humanitarian Award and FEI’s Man of the Year. Monty was recently included as Horse and Hound Magazine’s Top 50 Horsemen of All Time. Monty is credited with launching the first of its kind Equus Online University; an interactive online lesson site that is the definitive learning tool for violence-free training.

Monty Roberts has created Join-Up International, a 501c3 non-profit foundation. With his learning center on his Flag Is Up Farms in Solvang, California, he has produced a growing list of certified instructors globally. These facts insure that Monty will meet his life’s goal which is to leave the world a better place than he found it for horses and for people, too.   www.MontyRoberts.com

 

Dr. Juliet Getty Speaks on Equine Nutrition on Monty Roberts’ Horsemanship Radio

Wednesday, October 31st, 2018

Dr. Juliet Getty, internationally respected equine nutritionist, speaks periodically on the award winning Horsemanship Radio. Her recent interview with the show’s host, Monty Roberts’ daughter, Debbie Roberts Loucks, can be heard at www.HorsemanshipRadio.com, where she offers whole food tips for your horse’s health 

Check out Episode #120 at minute marker 34.10 to enjoy this 10 minute discussion.  Horsemanship Radio is dedicated to the exploration of good horsemanship throughout the world, offering tips and interviews that explore good horsemanship.

Interviews are also archived at www.gettyequinenutrition.com.

Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. is an independent equine nutritionist with a wide U.S. and international following. Her research-based approach optimizes equine health by aligning physiology and instincts with correct feeding and nutrition practices. Dr. Getty’s goal is to empower the horseperson with the confidence and knowledge to provide the best nutrition for his or her horse’s needs.

Dr. Getty’s fundamental resource book, Feed Your Horse Like a Horse, is available in paperback as well as in hardcover and Kindle versions. All except the Kindle version are available at www.GettyEquineNutrition.com— buy the book there and have it inscribed by the author. Print and Kindle versions are also available at Amazon (www.Amazon.com); find print versions at other online retail bookstores. The seven individual volumes in Dr. Getty’s topic-centered “Spotlight on Equine Nutrition” series are available with special package pricing at her website, and also at Amazon in print and Kindle versions. Dr. Getty’s books make ideal gifts for equestrians!

Find a world of useful information for the horseperson at www.GettyEquineNutrition.com: Sign up for Dr. Getty’s informative, free e-newsletter, Forage for Thought; browse her library of articles and tips; listen to recorded interviews; and purchase recordings of her educational teleseminars and webinars.

Find a variety of quality supplements and whole foods at her online Free Shipping Supplement Store[i]. Reach Dr. Getty directly at gettyequinenutrition@gmail.com.

[i] http://horsesupplements.gettyequinenutrition.biz

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 31, 2018

www.gettyequinenutrition.com

 

World-Renowned Horseman and Brooke Global Ambassador Monty Roberts will Demonstrate His Methods at FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018 (WEG)

Monday, July 30th, 2018

July 30, 2018 Solvang, California: Brooke USA, sister charity of Brooke, the official charity of the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018, has announced that renowned horseman Monty Roberts will be among their presenters at the games this September in North Carolina.

Monty Roberts, known as the “Man Who Listens to Horses,” is also an official Global Ambassador for Brooke. He has made it his lifelong mission to leave the world a better place for horses and people. Concurrently, for more than 80 years, Brooke, the world’s largest international equine welfare charity, has been dedicated to improving the lives of working horses, donkeys and mules and the families they support in the developing world. This aligned mission and Monty’s global impact on the welfare of equines was the impetus for Brooke USA to partner with Monty to present demonstrations of his work during the games.

Monty is perhaps best known for creating the revolutionary equine training technique called “Join-Up®.”  He has won countless awards and received immense worldwide press coverage, put three books on the New York Times best-seller list, helped start Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s race horses in England and been awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Zurich.

The demonstrations will take place on September 19th and 20th.  In one, Monty will work with an American Mustang to demonstrate the “Horse Sense & Healing” program for veterans and first responders. Monty will demonstrate the power of horses to teach resiliency and trust by inviting a veteran with little – to no – horse experience, assisted by Monty and a horse to achieve “Join-Up.”

The second day Monty will demonstrate successful ways to work with a remedial issue in a horse.

The mission of Brooke USA is to significantly improve the welfare of working horses, donkeys and mules and the people they serve throughout Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America by raising funds and responsibly directing them to the areas of greatest need.  Working primarily through Brooke, Brooke USA funds scientifically proven, practical, sustainable and culturally relevant solutions to enormous equine welfare challenges.

To learn more about Brooke USA, please go to: www.BrookeUSA.org or contact Cindy.Rullman@BrookeUSA.org, or 859-296-0037. To learn more about Monty Roberts, please visit his website: www.montyroberts.com, phone 805-688–6288, or info@montyroberts.com.

People can see Monty work at these upcoming clinics too:

  • August 6–10, 2018 Monty’s Special Training at Flag Is Up Farms, California USA
  • August 20 to 24, 2018 In Portuguese, Monty’s Special Training at Flag Is Up Farms, California

Updated details can be found here: http://www.montyroberts.com/ab_about_monty_calendar/see-monty/

 

###

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Debbie Loucks

Monty and Pat Roberts, Inc./Join-Up® International

(949) 632-1856

debbie@montyroberts.com

 

MONTY ROBERTS AVAILABLE FOR SELECT INTERVIEWS:

The New York Times bestselling author and world-renowned horse trainer Monty Roberts is available for interviews.

MONTY ROBERTS first gained widespread fame with the release of his New York Times Best Selling book, The Man Who Listens To Horses; a chronicle of his life and development of his non-violent horse training methods called Join-Up®. Monty grew up on a working horse farm as a firsthand witness to traditional, often violent methods of horse training and breaking the spirit with an abusive hand. Rejecting that, he went on to win nine world’s championships in the show ring. Today, Monty’s goal is to share his message that “Violence is never the answer.” Roberts has been encouraged by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II with the award of the Membership in The Royal Victorian Order, as well as becoming Patron of Join-Up International. Other honors received were the ASPCA “Founders” award and the MSPCA George T. Angell Humanitarian Award and FEI’s Man of the Year. Monty was recently included as Horse and Hound Magazine’s Top 50 Horsemen of All Time. Monty is credited with launching the first of its kind Equus Online University; an interactive online lesson site that is the definitive learning tool for violence-free training.

JOIN-UP philosophies can be seen at work with both humans and horses across the world, from farms to major corporations. To learn more about Monty Roberts or the many applications of his Join-Up training methods, visit www.montyroberts.com . Horse Sense and Soldiers aired on Discovery Military highlighting the therapeutic effect that horses and Monty Roberts’ Join-Up® have on PTSD. Roberts has teamed with The Corporate Learning Institute to help transfer the key learning’s from his work to the workplace.

Brooke USA: to learn more about Brooke USA, please go to: www.BrookeUSA.org or contact Cindy.Rullman@BrookeUSA.org, or 859-296-0037.

 

 

Unusual animal encounters

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Dear Monty.

I am 63 yrs old this year, I was raised around horses from birth. My Dad loved them and started his own cross-breed that made for a beautiful animal. He gave me a wonderful little bay gelding when I was 10.

Unfortunately, at the time I seemed to have more interest in conveyances of the motorized type and didn’t pay enough attention to Teddy. So, guess-what? Dad sold Teddy!

It took me a long time to really come to my senses, but I have regretted for many years the outcome of my lack-of-interest. There is still one descendant of Dad’s herd here on the farm as well as two of my daughter’s horses; her daughter’s mini and two more, belonging to my son. I don’t do much with them other than to make sure they have feed and aren’t injured and help the granddaughter with her mini when she visits. It seems there’s always too many other, more-important things to occupy my mind.

Just a few days ago I had the most amazing encounter with a wild/feral horse. Anyhow, I was driving around out in the bush west of my home, here in central Alberta when I came across a lone horse, about 100 yards distant, grazing in a recently-logged-off and scarified area.

I stopped the truck, took a picture and watched the horse for a few minutes and spoke to him once. He looked-up at me for a minute then carried on grazing. I then decided, what-the-heck, I’m going to see how close I can get to this fellow. So I started slowly walking his way. Each time that he lifted his head and appeared about to take flight, I would retreat a couple steps, turn my body at about 45 degrees to him and cast my eyes downward till he settled into grazing again. (Incidentally, I have read some of your work and was enrolled in your online university for one year).

Now this is where things got really interesting! I was now about 20 feet from the horse and he seemed fairly calm, having only flared his nostrils and blown softly a couple times. I could now see that he was an intact stallion and terribly scarred-up all over both sides of his back. The scarring and the fact he was alone, leads me to think he’d recently got run out of his herd. He was a nicely set-up little guy maybe 14-1/2 hands and if I had to guess, about 4 or 5 yrs old. Short-coupled; head and feet just-a-bit big for his body, with I believe, a touch of draft in him (he had a bit of long hair on his fetlocks). Predominately Dark Bay running into a Liver-Chestnut splash over the rump. All-in-all a nice-looking little fellow.

So at this point I had come to a large poplar log between us, so decided to just, set-a-spell. The horse then proceeded to circle around so that he was down-wind of me, alternately grazing and nonchalantly studying me. All the while, I too, tried not to stare at him too intently, just casually glancing up, then back down to his front legs.

After a couple minutes he started coming in the last 15 ft to me, till he got to where it looked like he would like to make one more step, but that would have required him to step over a small log and a gouge in the ground, which had been left by the scarifyer. This would have brought him in about two steps and I believe he was not comfortable with that idea. (I still chuckle to myself as I recall watching him ponder this)!

I thought I’d help him out, so slowly began to reach my hand out to him. He too reached out, to within about 8 inches of my hand, just briefly, then after a few seconds, quickly turned and trotted off about 20 feet and turned at about 45 degrees to me and stood casually looking at me for a bit.

I stayed seated on the log with my eyes mostly downcast but glancing up now and again. Suddenly he turned to face my way, from 20 feet out, square-on and let out the most powerful snort I have ever heard from any horse! I mean, like he put every ounce he had, into it I’m sure. Funny thing is, by this time I was so deep into this amazing encounter I didn’t even flinch, in spite of this sudden and powerful out-burst.

After standing looking right at me a bit with eyes wide and flared nostrils , he calmed down then quartered away, alternately cropping grass, glancing back and moving away till he disappeared over a hill some three hundred yards off. Finally Monty, I have come to my question! Did I miss my cue there? When he turned and moved away after sniffing my hand. Was it my turn to move towards him and I didn’t realize it?

Twenty-twenty hind-sight tells me he was enjoying this little game just as much as I was, and that, that was his invite for Join-Up? Also, what was that resounding snort? (Remember this came after the hand sniffing and retreat.) Was that perhaps a scare tactic, to see if I would take flight? Or, was he just (ha ha) voicing his disgust, at my lack of knowledge, of the rules-of-the-game!

A little background on the horse. He was in an area frequented by people on quads, dirt bikes and such, and so, used to seeing humans regularly, although never me, nor me him. Whether he had ever had contact with humans I do not know.

In closing I want to thank you Monty for sharing with the entire world, your vast knowledge of equine behavior and showing people how they can better interact with horses and other creatures, even humans. I have done some partially successful Join-Ups with some of our horses except for one docile little mutt who refuses to go into flight mode! So I want to study more of your lessons and put them into practice, therefor I intend to re-enroll, as soon as funds allow.

I apologize for such a lengthy story but, I was so fascinated, by this chance encounter, I just had to share, in hopes that other readers may find it interesting. I want to point out that the terrain we were in allowed me to keep some sort of obstacle; a tree, a stump, a fallen log, etc. between us, (just in case) at all times.
Although my Buddy showed no sign of aggression I thought it best to be careful. Thank you, and I do hope you will be able to find the time to respond. Sorry, I know you are a very busy man.

Sincerely,
Gerald Hoszouski, Alberta

Monty’s Answer

Dear Gerald,

Thank you for sharing the details of your encounter. You probably already know that my life has been filled with similar episodes. I have been able to write regarding about 10 percent of similar encounters. My life has been blessed with so many opportunities to communicate with the wild animals inhabiting this earth of ours.

There are so many educated people that have a hard enough time believing what I’ve been through as it is, I have never told the story about the dove on the fence of Flag Is Up Farms. I drove by in my pickup several times and realized that she just kept sitting there. I stopped, got out of my pickup, went to her and put my hand out.

I held my hand about six inches from her and watched as she elevated her wings and then just made a hop to sit on my finger. I had an employee in the pickup who was astonished by what he saw. Something had told me that this bird was ready to have a meeting with a human being. Nobody has to believe this but it’s true.

You had your encounter, nobody has to believe you either. Hold your memories as they belong simply to the two of you. I certainly can believe you, because I’ve had so many similar occasions. I will paraphrase how I see your episode taking shape and coming to a conclusion.

Let me suggest that there is a strong possibility that this horse was 11 or 12 years old and had been kicked out of his harem by a younger stallion. Let me say that it’s possible he was looking for some sort of meeting with another animal he thought he could trust. He wasn’t going to test the difficult terrain for that last few

inches, but as you suggest, he moved to a downwind position, this is not uncommon.

As the scent of your humanity drifted on the wind, let’s predict that it loaded up his olfactory plate. Let’s suggest that his mind was so preoccupied with you he suddenly realized he could no longer smell you. It was then that he blasted a huge volume of air across the plate to clear off the accumulated smells. He once again could identify odors with clarity, it was then that he probably decided not to take a chance on you.

Recently I had a similar letter from a man who took walks in the woods. This time it was a deer with the same sort of experience that you had with the horse. I suppose it’s fair to say that the closer I can bring people to the acceptable body positions the more of these kinds of experiences we will hear about. I would suggest traveling to the area as much as possible. You may even find another horse if your body positions are right.

Thank you so much for your inquiry. Savor this moment for the balance of your days. This horse will undoubtedly remember you. Remember, horses never forget anything, and I am sure this was a special moment in his life.
Sincerely,
Monty

 

The International Society of Equitation and Monty Roberts’ Join-Up®

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

A comparison between the Monty Roberts technique and the conventional UK technique for initial training of riding horses 

monty

Solvang, CA – The scientific paper authored by Drs. Veronica Fowler, Mark Kennedy and David Marlin entitled ‘A comparison between the Monty Roberts technique and a conventional UK technique for initial training of riding horses’ was accepted for and published in Anthrozoös. Anthrozoös is a quarterly, peer-reviewed multidisciplinary journal reporting the interactions of people and animals, a journal which has enjoyed a distinguished history as a pioneer in the field since its launch in 1987. Prior to appearing in print in Anthrozoös the study was presented at the International Society of Equitation Science (ISES) having been accepted by the scientific committee and also presented at the Centre for Animal Welfare & Anthrozoology, Department of Veterinary Medicine University of Cambridge both. 

Comment from Dr. Veronica Fowler on the results of the study:

“This study describes a comparison of the efficacy of the Monty Roberts horsemanship technique in comparison to a UK conventional training technique for the initial training of horses. Initial training of young horses, in particular the first time a horse is saddled and ridden has been recently reported in the scientific literature as a significant stressor in terms of the impact on the welfare of the horse. It is therefore vital that we fully evaluate the techniques which are practiced around the world to identify those which have the potential to cause compromised welfare and suffering during foundation training of horses.  

Our study reports that horses trained using Monty Roberts’ methods had significantly lower maximum heart rates (bpm) during both first saddle and first rider when compared to a UK conventional training method. Monty Roberts trained horses did have significantly lower heart rates during first saddle and first rider backing process (i.e. heart rate reduced between first saddle and first rider), a finding which has never previously been reported in the scientific literature. Thus the heart rates observed from Monty Roberts trained horses during first saddle and first rider are currently the lowest reported for any training regime reported in the literature to date.

The use of the round pen and in particular the technique of Join-up have been frequently criticized and reported in the literature to be another significant stressor due to the perceived opinion that this environment and method overtly activates the flight response. Our study could find no evidence that the use of the round pen or, indeed the technique of Join-up, was fear inducing and thus a significant stressor to the horse based on heart rate alone. In fact, we found that the heart rate of horses during this technique were considerably below the maximum heart rate for horses of this age and breed. 

Following 20 days of training (30 minutes/horse/day) the study horses undertook a standardized ridden obstacle and flatwork test and a ridden freestyle test. Heart rates recorded during these tests for both training regimes were not significantly different; however Monty Robert’s trained horses scored significantly higher in all three tests as determined by a panel of judges who were unaware of the study or the trainers involved in the study.  

Our manuscript therefore provides peer reviewed scientific substance to indicate that that the Monty Roberts training technique is highly efficacious in terms of the effect on the welfare and performance of the horse undergoing foundation training.”

Recently, a student under the supervision of Professor P. McGreevy of the University of Sydney, Australia, set out to discredit round pen techniques, specifically Monty Roberts’ Join-Up® methods. This video demonstrates the explicit reasons behind the student’s paper in her own words, specifically mentioning Her Majesty The Queen of England. http://www.smh.com.au/environment/animals/science-takes-on-the-man-who-listens-to-horses-20120713-2219x.html  An abstract of that paper was presented at the International Society of Equitation Science (ISES) conference in Edinburgh, Scotland during their conference. 

Mr. Roberts responded that his Join-Up® method uses both positive and negative reinforcement, and negative reinforcement could be a ”good thing.”

”How do you get a horse to move off your leg? You lay your leg against the horse with pressure and then when the horse steps away you remove the pressure – that’s negative reinforcement,” said Mr. Roberts, who advocates non-violence and uses choice without pain or force in the training of horses in front of live audiences worldwide.

”Everybody that ever works with a horse stresses a horse. You will stress a horse when you bring him out of a meadow,” said Mr. Roberts. “They have to go through a certain amount of stress in order to accept they are going to live with humans,” he said. 

Compare this student’s paper making the news in equestrian circles worldwide with a controlled Science Trial and published in a legitimate Science Journal Anthrozoös referenced by Fowler V. Kennedy M. and Marlin D. (2012) A Comparison of the Monty Roberts Technique with a Conventional UK technique for initial training of riding horses. Anthrozoös. Vol. 25 (3). 

 

 

Monty Roberts Willing Partners™: Sugar Daddy

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013
 
“Sugardaddy” is a 2009 grey gelding 15.2hh. This horse is an intelligent partner with a generous and sweet nature. His smooth gaits make him a pleasure to ride. Can be ridden Western or English.

CelebritySugarDaddyCoverPhoto

Watch Sugardaddy perform Western dry work and over challenging obstacles:

Celebrity-Sugardaddy-english

Watch Sugardaddy being ridden English, and being trained to pull a cart:

Celebrity-Sugardaddy-pedigree

 

Ask Monty: Isn’t it OK to hit the horse who bites you?

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

Editor’s note: This post from Monty is in response to a Facebook comment raising the issue of hitting a horse that bites…

Dear Derek,

I couldn’t ask for a better opening of the door for me to explain my position regarding the statements that you made which I am considering a question. Your response is an invitation to thousands to better understand that the human mind, in the horse world, is still not traveling with the mind of the horse. To strike a horse for pain is the world’s #1 worst piece of horsemanship. And while one might perceive the immediate results to be effective the damage done is permanent. To hit a horse anywhere about the head for the act of biting will produce a more effective biter. Your question is perfect to promote learning.

So, you were walking down through the stable and the horse bit you and it hurt so you hit the horse back. Can you immediately see two young lads playing in the sandbox and operating under this same theory. Pretty soon, you have a war and often the parents enter in and the whole thing ends up as a gang rumble. Do you really think that hitting the horse will somehow cause it to rationalize that the next time you walk through the barn he won’t bite you. I have spent 75 years proving that he simply becomes a more dangerous biter. Striking sets a pattern so that after the clamp-down of teeth there is an immediate draw back that really hurts.

In my writings I have consistently suggested way to take the horses brain to another part of their anatomy. One can set it up for the stable as well. The knowing horseman will realize that since we domesticated horses and tend to place them in little rooms for an extended period of their existence, they tend to become territorial. A man’s home is his castle and we tend to believe that for ourselves. There are many ways to deal with territorial behavior and I suggest that you continue to study my concepts as you will undoubtedly evolve to the position that you ultimately will realize that I have done my homework and have addressed your concerns.

It is with regularity that I hear people say “Oh, Monty people don’t believe in striking horses anymore. You have done a great job of educating the world that violence is never the answer.” I appreciate your fortitude in deciding to open this door by coming forward with the comments that I have read from you. It proves categorically that I have NOT finished my mission and that I can’t afford to get old and die. I need to keep getting up every morning and even working harder to learn more so that I can pass it on to those that are still on the curve. Thank you so much for giving me the opportunity to invite you to deeper study my concepts.

Just 3 days ago I dealt with a horse that was extremely head shy. Some groom, owner or veterinarian, farrier or an individual unidentified had chosen to twist ears and strike the horse about the head. Horses don’t lie and this one leaves no room for error, she was abused. By chance I happened on to a procedure that I have never tried before and within 15 minutes I had a student walking up to her, rubbing her ears and massaging her entire head with his hands. These actions would have caused him to receive a front foot between his eyes only a few minutes before. This is a different subject and I will address it at a different time.

Monty Roberts

Editor’s note (2): For solutions on dealing with horses without resorting to violence, and gaining an understanding of the horse’s nature and mindset, please see Monty’s textbook, From My Hands to Yours. You can also sign up for Monty’s free weekly enewsletter, called Ask Monty, in which Monty answers questions about horses and horsemanship. Below is his answer to a previous question about hitting horses that bite. Keep learning!

Ask Monty Question, 11/25/2009: Why don’t you hit a horse when it bites you?

Monty’s Answer: Attacking the point of consternation is an open invitation to war. If we go to war with the horse it is likely the horse will win. They’re bigger, stronger and faster. What happens when one chooses to hit the horse for biting is that the biting will continue at the same level. The horse will become more cunning as to timing, faster on the attack and very quick to ‘jerk back’ anticipating being hit. The overall outcome is that the biting becomes much worse rather than experiencing an improvement.

Professional trainers will sometimes recommend harsh measures in an attempt to discourage biting. I have heard them say that you hit with your fist very hard at the slightest indication that a bite is coming. I have been told to use vibrating practical joke mechanisms which have a sharp point on them. Some have said to use a clothes peg to execute a painful pinch; I’ve even heard it recommended using a pair of pliers. The worst I know of is the recommendation to place a nail between your fingers jabbing the horse that bites.

Each of these measures is guaranteed to produce a horse which is a more dangerous biter than previously. One must agree to take all painful/violent measures out of the training scenario. It is critical that no attention is paid to the muzzle area of the biting horse whatsoever. These measures will simply cause the horse to bite down with the teeth and then exit taking parts of your clothing and possibly even your skin along with him. There are much more effective ways to deal with this problem.

First let me say that when I deal with biting horses more than 90% of them have been fed treats from the human hand. When we associate food with the human body we are training horses to bite, science has found that the same is true for sharks and other ocean predators. Often times the owner will say they have never fed from the hand only to find out that the damage was done by a previous owner long before the current one was on the scene. Remember, we still have the problem to deal with.

Once all hand feeding has been eliminated the effective horse person will watch the horse closely and instantly take action on the very moment the horse initiates a bite. The action should be to bump the horse on the shin with your boot, not kick the horse, bump the horse, pain is not advisable. What you are after is a distraction which takes the horses mind to another part of their anatomy. One can step on the coronary band (hair line) and let your heel slide down the hoof itself. Horses respond differently; selecting one method is helpful.

Immediately after distracting the horse simply walk away leading the horse with you, stop, observe and respond to any act of biting in the fashion I have recommended. Typically, after about 8 repetitions, the horse will start to bite then stop and look down at his shin or his foot. In using this method one has used distractibility to your advantage. Horses have an ample supply of distractibility and one can eliminate violence and utilize this characteristic to their advantage particularly in this area of biting.

 

Monty Roberts: Put the needs of the horse first

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

If a person is going to be successful in the horse world, you have got to decide what you want for yourself. The needs of the horse come before wanting to win championships; wanting to make money; wanting to be successful internally. It is a partnership. Your horse is critical. His needs must be met first, and if his needs are not met, your performance will pay a price.

We need to know what that horse considers to be a reward. As predators, we know food as a reward. There is, in our DNA [deoxyribonucleic acid], a factor for considering food a reward, but no blade of grass has ever run from a horse. No horse felt the need to stalk down a blade of grass and kill it, and then eat it. Food is just there, for them.

So what does a horse consider as a reward? Often times it is just the ceasing of work. Just stopping. Giving them a rub. Getting off their backs, if we’re on them. Walking them around. Walking away from them is a reward, that tells them that you are not predatorial. Think of innovative ways to reward your horse in HIS language. Which is to say, “I like you, and I’m not going to hurt you.”

Horses are very generous animals. They are ambitious. They have a lot of energy. So they don’t want to just stand around, they want to do things but be careful. Monitor them. Observe them. When they’ve had enough, ease up. Reward them. Stop. Get off. Give them a rub and walk away.

Your chances for success will fall right off the table if the needs of the horse are not met. When you meet his needs, then your chances go sky-rocketing. One can’t simply be conceited about it, or arrogant, when the horse meets your needs. The reason that you can not do that, is that you will start to overwhelm your horse, with your own requirements.

Study. Learn what he needs. Provide those needs and your chances for success will sky-rocket.

– Monty Roberts

Editor’s note: Find Monty’s principles illustrated and discussed in his Equus Online University: https://www.montyroberts.com/university

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