Ardall Mannequin Rider

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The Ardall is a device for training horses. Designed primarily to accustom unbroken horses, or horses that have not been ridden for some time, to safely accept a rider, it can also be used for training performance horses.

To buy an Ardall dummy rider for your horse, got to: https://www.montyroberts.com/shop/equipment/ardall-mannequin/

“In addition to rearing The Queen’s bloodstock, we run a pre-training programme to take The Queen’s thoroughbred yearlings to the point where they are ridden at a hack canter before being passed on to their trainers. Monty Roberts is closely involved in the process from weaning to entering training with a primary intention to minimise stress – both to the horses and to the staff. Over the last two years, the Ardall Dummy has become a vital component of this process and has provided a major step towards achieving our aims.”

Joe Grimwade, LVO (Manager), The Royal Studs

The Ardall Consists of Four Main Parts:

Ardall-SR2

1. The Torso

The main part of the product resembles a legless, human torso with short arms. At its core, there is a coiled spring, which facilitates movement when mounted on a horse. This spring is enveloped with medium-grade foam in the shape of a torso, which is covered with high quality, UV-protected leatherette.

2. The Base

The torso is affixed to a flat, solid base, which has been specially moulded to fit any standard saddle. This is covered in the same leatherette as the torso. On either side, there are two straps – used for securing the Ardall onto the horse – and one screw-on ring, through which the reins go during lunging and long-reining.

3. The Harness

An essential component of the product when in use, the harness fits onto the torso. The extent to which the Ardall moves when mounted on a horse is regulated by the tightness or looseness of the harness.

4. Weights

These weights serve to make the Ardall heavier helping to introduce the horse to the sensation of a rider’s legs on either side. These take the form of two boot-shaped canvas bags, which are filled evenly with fine sand (up to 2 stone/12.7KG in each.) These are clipped onto the Ardall, one on each side, and secured with straps.