Monty Roberts’ Upcoming Clinic Dates in California and the UK

September 13th, 2016
clippers_2
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
Media Contact: Debbie Loucks
Monty and Pat Roberts, Inc./Join-Up® International
(949) 632-1856

August 29, 2016, Solvang, California: Monty Roberts and his professional team teaches RIDING WITH RESPECT; striving for partnership and communication with your horse through non-violent training. This year’s dates are September 24-25. More information can be found here: http://www.montyroberts.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/RwR_Sept2016.pdf
 
This is a unique opportunity to attend a ridden clinic at Flag Is Up Farms in Solvang, California. The clinic consists of two days of group training for you and your horse. Instruction will be tailored to meet your level of riding. All disciplines and types of horses are welcome; however, if you want to bring a young horse, we suggest you have had 60 plus days of ridden training prior to the clinic. Maximum 10 people with horses. A limited number of our Willing Partners™ horses are available to ride in the clinic for an additional fee. Lunch is included. Riding with Respect is Saturday/Sunday, September 24-25 • $600/weekend or $350/day with your own horse • $900/weekend or $450/day with a Willing Partners™ horse http://www.montyroberts.com/horses/willing-partners-program/  Email info@montyroberts.com or Call 805-688-6288
 
In the United Kingdom, Roberts will be demonstrating on these dates and locations:

October 15th in Lancashire, October 21st Hartpury Gloucester, October 26th Surrey, October 29th Devon, November 3rd East Yorkshire, and November 5th Lincolnshire. Ticket info: http://www.montyroberts.com/ab_about_monty_calendar/see-monty/

Roberts’ first public demonstrations were in the United States beginning in 1986. They were limited to two or three public demonstrations per year. It was April of 1989 when he met Her Majesty, the Queen. At the conclusion of one week’s work at Windsor Castle, Her Majesty arranged for 21 cities and 98 horses that were added to the 23 horses Roberts worked with at Windsor in a five-day period of time. The total on the trip was 121 horses.

To date, Roberts’ overall statistics read like this:

27 years
10,800 horses
2,763 public events
2.3 million miles
3.6 million attendees
41 countries
2,950 untrained horses (first saddle and first rider)
2,750 non-loaders
5,100 random remedial horses
Cancellations – zero
Illnesses – zero
 
###

Science Confirms It: Join-Up® is Gentle on Horses

September 13th, 2016
photo-04-06-2016-16-24-05
A paper titled “Monty Roberts’ public demonstrations: Preliminary report on the heart rate and heart rate variability of horses undergoing training during live audience events” has been accepted for publication in the international journal “Animals.”

“Animals” is an international and interdisciplinary scholarly open access journal concerned with publishing high quality scientific papers within the field of ‘animals’, including zoology, ethnozoology, animal science, animal ethics and animal welfare. In particular, this journal showcases scientific study describing animals’ interactions with the outside world, including humans. “Animals” is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) and takes the responsibility to enforce a rigorous peer-review together with strict ethical policies and standards to ensure the addition of high quality scientific works to the field of scholarly publication.

This new paper describes the opportunistic collection and analysis of heart rate (HR; beat-to-beat intervals) and heart rate variability (HRV) of 10 horses being trained during Monty Roberts’ public demonstrations within the United Kingdom and is authored by Loni Loftus, Kelly Marks, Rosie Jones-McVey, Jose L. Gonzales and Dr. Veronica L. Fowler (lead author).

Key findings from the study include:

• Stress responses recorded in this study were comparable (e.g. when compared to horses undergoing foundation training) or more favorable (e.g. when compared to novel object tests, handling tests or horses anticipating competition) to previously reported studies in the literature. 
• Stress responses during public demonstrations were proportional to low-moderate exercise intensities described in other training methods where horses were under similar levels of physiological stress as reported in literature.
• The stress responses during a specific training method known as “Join-Up®” were comparable to other methods of training used by Monty Roberts during public demonstrations, and were consistent with exercise intensity (physiological stress). There was no evidence that Join-Up® altered HR and HRV in a way to suggest that this training method presents the horse with psychological or physical stressors which would negatively affect welfare. 
• There was preliminary evidence that training undertaken in a roundpen, including Join-Up® controls or inhibits the flight response (limits the fear response). 


In conclusion, training of horses during public demonstrations is a mild stressor for horses. However the stress responses observed within this study were comparable or less to those previously reported in the literature for horses being trained outside of public audience events and was indicative of exercise at low-moderate intensity (physiological stress), rather than psychological stress. 

The full paper will be available open access within 10 days.

###

612 Questions You Asked Monty Roberts

July 29th, 2016

July 29, 2016 Solvang, California: Monty Roberts is back from touring the world this spring, helping owners and horses face their fears and learn to trust each other. When given the chance, we sat down with Roberts to hear what advice he had for students who hope to understand horse behavior a little better.

Turns out that Monty and Pat Roberts, owners of Flag Is Up Farms, are celebrating their 50th year of gentle horse training in their Solvang, California location. As we were preparing for this interview, Roberts had been preparing to greet a variety students throughout the summer of courses, including a group of Brazilians. Much of the work is hands-on training like the Gentling Wild Horses course and Join-Up, using the methods Monty discovered while still a teenager in Nevada watching mustang herds interact. The students will get a rare look at Monty Roberts’ lifetime of knowledge and experience, but we first wanted to ask how people who couldn’t afford to travel to and participate in courses would ever be able to learn what he knows.

Monty’s Special Training Week is August 1st to 5th, where he works with a variety of horses. Students will observe how Monty Roberts’ concepts work with problem horses, young horses and unhanded horses, across all breeds and many disciplines. Following this first week, students will then participate in the Join-Up® Course followed by the Long Lining Course to experience how communication with horses in the round pen happens, hands-on. Included in the courses is a subscription to Monty’s Equus Online University. This online learning tool will support the continuing education in Monty’s methods.

What we hadn’t anticipated was that Monty already had a plan for people who could not journey to him to learn. His answer came in the form of a question, “Have you seen what I created for the world to have in perpetuity? Since 2004 I have been answering questions from horse owners, trainers and lovers as they come to me. Once per week I publish my answers for anyone one who wants to learn, as my gift to the horse world.”

While we were aware of Roberts’ Equus Online University, we admitted to him that we hadn’t added up the weekly questions and Monty’s answers to learn that he already had a library of over 612 nuggets of knowledge based on a lifetime of training championship horses. This was the wealth of knowledge we had hoped to share with you, and more. There is even a free Daypass allowing us to log on and test ride the lessons. Best of all, the 612 questions and Monty’s answers do not require paid access. As Monty said, they are his gift to those wishing to learn gentler, more humane ways to train horses. Access to the Equus Online University can be found here: www.MontyRobertsUniversity.com/library

The courses are:

August 1–5, 2016 Monty’s Special Training at Flag Is Up Farms, California USA

Aug 22–2 Sep Gentling Wild Horses course at Flag Is Up Farm, California USA

And more: http://www.montyroberts.com/ab_about_monty_calendar/see-monty/

Email info@montyroberts.com or Call 805-688-6288

Monty Roberts Announces ‘Riding with Respect’ Dates

July 29th, 2016

July 29, 2016 Solvang, California: Monty Roberts’ professional team teaches RIDING WITH RESPECT; striving for partnership and communication with your horse through non-violent training. This year’s dates are September 24-25. More information can be found here: http://www.montyroberts.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/RwR_Sept2016.pdf

This is a unique opportunity to attend a ridden clinic at Flag Is Up Farms. The clinic consists of two days of group training for you and your horse. Instruction will be tailored to meet your level of riding. All disciplines and types of horses are welcome; however, if you want to bring a young horse, we suggest you have had 60 plus days of ridden training prior to the clinic.

Maximum 10 people with horses. A limited number of our Willing Partners™ horses are available to ride in the clinic for an additional fee. Lunch is included.

Riding with Respect is Saturday/Sunday, September 24-25

$600/weekend or $350/day with your own horse

$900/weekend or $450/day with a Willing Partners™ horse http://www.montyroberts.com/horses/willing-partners-program/

Email info@montyroberts.com or Call 805-688-6288

Last Chance Deal! Monty’s Summer Courses

July 27th, 2016

The Monty Roberts International Learning Center wants to make sure you are not missing out on our 50th Year Anniversary Special Summer Offer.

We have combined some of our courses taught by Monty with hands-on classes where you can learn the silent language of horses, “Equus.”

Come and join us for this once in a lifetime opportunity.

I hope to welcome you here for one of our exciting packages at the Monty Roberts International Learning Center this Summer.

For more information, go to:
https://montyrobertsshop.com/collections/courses/products/packages-educational-package

Kind Regards,

Denise Heinlein, Head Instructor
Monty Roberts International Learning Center

Package_grande

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cowboy and The Queen

July 20th, 2016

cowboy and the queen

 

When the British Monarch called on Monty Roberts wishing to learn more, that began a mission that grows today “to leave the world a better place for horses and for people, too.” Read the full article here: http://www.montyroberts.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/2016_7-SBNP-Monty-Roberts-the-Queen-ARTICLE.pdf

 

Horse Sense and Healing Program Receives $50,000 Grant from Disabled Veterans National Foundation

July 14th, 2016

June 30, 2016 Solvang, California: Monty Roberts, founder of Join-Up® International, and the Board of Directors of the California non-profit corporation, were pleased to announce the addition of four dates in 2016. July 8-10, August 19-21, September 30-October 2, and December 9-11.

Grants provide much-needed help to cover the costs of the Horse Sense and Healing clinics for veterans with Post Traumatic Stress injuries.

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation (DVNF) has provided grants. Joseph VanFonda (USMC SgtMaj Ret.), CEO of DVNF, said, “Join-Up’s mission is both unique, and for many of our nation’s veterans, it is also life-changing. The impact this program has on the lives of veterans is one DVNF is glad to support.” VanFonda also expressed that it is the hope of DVNF that these funds help with Join-Up International’s continuous commitment to the veterans’ community.

Marsha St. Clair, the member of the Board of Directors who corresponded with DVNF to obtain the grant was excited to share the news of the generosity of the foundation, saying “We urge those of you who believe in and support our program, Horse Sense and Healing, to spread the word about how both organizations together are making a difference to help our Veterans in need.”

Monty Roberts, renowned horse gentler, began running free-of-charge, resilience-building workshops for veterans and their families in 2010. The three-day program involves working closely with horses. The individuals and horses develop a special bond built upon mutual trust and respect. Join-Up offers everyone an effective tool to rediscover themselves through the eyes of the horse. This self-awareness exercise deals effectively with emotional trauma, anti-social behavior, withdrawal, anger, stress and Post Traumatic Stress Injury (PTSI).

Roberts holds two Ph.Ds in Behavioral Sciences. In these workshops, he demonstrates the deep healing power of establishing a trusting relationship with horses without the use of force. Roberts assists veterans as they learn to develop a partnership with the horse. After three transformational days, veterans can better understand how to control their anger, confront painful memories, cope with real-life situations, and move on with their lives and relationships.

“Because the Horse Sense and Healing clinics are free-of-charge to veterans, donations and grants are the only sources of income to help Join-Up International put more deserving veterans and their families through the program,” said Debbie Loucks, Director of Development.

Executive Director, Pat Roberts, is looking forward to hosting the next three day clinic July 8-10. She urges those who want to learn more to go to www.join-up.org/veterans .

For more information, email admin@join-up.org or call 805-688-6288 Pacific Standard Time.

 

###

 

Join-Up International is a California 501 (c) (3) organization (tax ID 77-0459889) founded by world renowned horse trainer Monty Roberts. Join-Up is dedicated to promoting gentle, effective alternatives to violence and force in both equine and human relationships. In 2012 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II became a patron of Join-Up International and we are deeply grateful for the support we receive from both Her Majesty and the members of our board.

Join-Up philosophies can be seen at work with both humans and horses across the world from farms to major corporations. To learn more about Monty Roberts or the many applications of his Join-Up training methods, visit www.montyroberts.com. Horse Sense and Soldiers aired on Discovery Military highlighting the therapeutic effect that horses and Monty Roberts’ Join-Up® have on PTSD. Monty’s Horse Sense and Healing program for military and first responder personnel with stress injuries are detailed here www.join-up.org/veterans .

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

DVNF achieves this mission by:

  • Offering direct financial support to veteran organizations that address the unique needs of veterans, and whose missions align with that of DVNF.
  • Providing supplemental assistance to homeless and low-income veterans through the Health & Comfort program and various empowerment resources.
  • Providing an online resource database that allows veterans to navigate the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service, as well as additional resources they need.
  • Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community, and educating the public accordingly.

MONTY ROBERTS AVAILABLE FOR SELECT INTERVIEWS: The New York Times bestselling author and world renowned horse trainer Monty Roberts is available for interviews.

MONTY ROBERTS first gained widespread fame with the release of his New York Times Best Selling book, The Man Who Listens To Horses; a chronicle of his life and development of his non-violent horse training methods called Join-Up®. Monty grew up on a working horse farm as a firsthand witness to traditional, often violent methods of horse training and breaking the spirit with an abusive hand. Rejecting that, he went on to win nine world’s championships in the show ring. Today Monty’s goal is to share his message that ”Violence is never the answer.” Roberts has been encouraged by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, with the award of the Membership in The Royal Victorian Order. Other honors received were the ASPCA “Founders” award and the MSPCA George T. Angell Humanitarian Award. Monty is credited with launching the first of its kind Equus Online University an interactive online lesson site that is the definitive learning tool for violence-free training.

Join-Up with a Shetland Pony in Scotland

July 13th, 2016

Fifi in field

Dear Monty,

My name is John Valentine from Aberdeen Scotland. I am one of your Online University students. I went down to Dorchester, in the UK, to see you at your demo in March this year. You are an inspiration to me and on hearing you say that you like to hear if your message is getting through I thought you might like to hear this story.

I was introduced to yourself and your ways by a friend Katrina Yule who grazes her rescued horses on neighbouring land to mine. They escaped one evening and I gave her a hand to get them in and helped repair the fence. She required some further assistance with the need for some shelter for a horse that required some medical attention. I had a small cattle shed which did the job nicely.

We got chatting and she introduced me to your ways via the internet. On seeing that I was interested to return the favour she kindly bought my girlfriend Anne and I tickets to see you at a Demo in Ingliston Country Club in Bishopton last October.

We thoroughly enjoyed the demo, purchased your book ‘The Man Who Listens to Horses’ which you signed for me. There was also a lady selling a round pen like the one used in the demo which I later purchased along with some very good invaluable advice and stories from her experiences.

Most of my experience has been with cattle and very little with horses, I was even slightly frightened of them when younger until a friend stuck me on ones back and taught me the very basics of riding. Once on Midges back I lost my fear as I felt he knew I was inexperienced and was kind of looking after me but that was over twenty years ago.

Anyway this is the story of Fifi a wee Shetland pony of about 12 years old to let you see that your message is getting through to a small place in the far northeast corner of Scotland.

Fifi had started out life in Ireland and Katrina landed with her when purchasing another horse, they were going to shoot her because no-one could handle her; when she got off the ferry Katrina told them if they got her in the horse box then she would take her. They did and when she arrived here Katrina could not get near her for three years no one got near enough to touch her. She could be moved along with some other horses but on one occasion she escaped into someone else’s field. The owner of these horses was going to keep Fifi but later changed her mind as she could not get near her. We got her separated and she landed in my wee cattle shed to give Katrina time to decide what to do with her. This was on a Saturday in February 2016.

I thought to myself this is no good it would be far better now we have her contained trying to get her gentled and used to being handled. Katrina said good luck but she had talked with a sanctuary who was willing to take her.

On the Monday morning I went in beside her in the enclosure. Using your principles along with an open mind and a bit of luck I managed to be able to place a hand on her neck and give her a stroke later that day. By the end of that week I was able to put a head collar on her and had her walking with me.

I had the suspicion that she may be pregnant Katrina confirmed this could be possible, all the more reason to get her used to being handled. You said that the horse tells you what has happened to them in the past. I suspect Fifi has not had a very good early life flinching each time a hand comes out of a pocket or when a rope is being waved about.

I have been introducing her to people who walk past and as many things as I can so she gets used to people and equipment.

We are at the stage where Anne or myself can catch her in open spaces, put a head collar on and lead her in. I can put the lead rope on her back look down her side cross her body and she will follow me in.

I have had no other training so have been totally going on your advice and methods using your basic principles. I have been working with some of Katrina’s other horses but Fifi was the first real challenge. My round pen is not set up properly yet but I am getting there.

I am learning how to remain calm and loads more and I am thoroughly enjoying the experience.

The Online University is excellent.

Thanks Monty.

John Valentine

Editor’s note: Visit Monty’s Online Uni with a free day pass, http://montyrobertsuniversity.com/promotions/daypass

Monty tells his life story

June 14th, 2016

Carte Blanche catches up with Monty Roberts. Watch this short (9 minute) video interview where Monty tells his story and shares his goals. Can subtle behavioral language used by horses to communicate with each other be used by humans too?

Watch the interview here: http://carteblanche.dstv.com/player/1059094/

video

Unusual animal encounters

June 7th, 2016

Dear Monty.

I am 63 yrs old this year, I was raised around horses from birth. My Dad loved them and started his own cross-breed that made for a beautiful animal. He gave me a wonderful little bay gelding when I was 10.

Unfortunately, at the time I seemed to have more interest in conveyances of the motorized type and didn’t pay enough attention to Teddy. So, guess-what? Dad sold Teddy!

It took me a long time to really come to my senses, but I have regretted for many years the outcome of my lack-of-interest. There is still one descendant of Dad’s herd here on the farm as well as two of my daughter’s horses; her daughter’s mini and two more, belonging to my son. I don’t do much with them other than to make sure they have feed and aren’t injured and help the granddaughter with her mini when she visits. It seems there’s always too many other, more-important things to occupy my mind.

Just a few days ago I had the most amazing encounter with a wild/feral horse. Anyhow, I was driving around out in the bush west of my home, here in central Alberta when I came across a lone horse, about 100 yards distant, grazing in a recently-logged-off and scarified area.

I stopped the truck, took a picture and watched the horse for a few minutes and spoke to him once. He looked-up at me for a minute then carried on grazing. I then decided, what-the-heck, I’m going to see how close I can get to this fellow. So I started slowly walking his way. Each time that he lifted his head and appeared about to take flight, I would retreat a couple steps, turn my body at about 45 degrees to him and cast my eyes downward till he settled into grazing again. (Incidentally, I have read some of your work and was enrolled in your online university for one year).

Now this is where things got really interesting! I was now about 20 feet from the horse and he seemed fairly calm, having only flared his nostrils and blown softly a couple times. I could now see that he was an intact stallion and terribly scarred-up all over both sides of his back. The scarring and the fact he was alone, leads me to think he’d recently got run out of his herd. He was a nicely set-up little guy maybe 14-1/2 hands and if I had to guess, about 4 or 5 yrs old. Short-coupled; head and feet just-a-bit big for his body, with I believe, a touch of draft in him (he had a bit of long hair on his fetlocks). Predominately Dark Bay running into a Liver-Chestnut splash over the rump. All-in-all a nice-looking little fellow.

So at this point I had come to a large poplar log between us, so decided to just, set-a-spell. The horse then proceeded to circle around so that he was down-wind of me, alternately grazing and nonchalantly studying me. All the while, I too, tried not to stare at him too intently, just casually glancing up, then back down to his front legs.

After a couple minutes he started coming in the last 15 ft to me, till he got to where it looked like he would like to make one more step, but that would have required him to step over a small log and a gouge in the ground, which had been left by the scarifyer. This would have brought him in about two steps and I believe he was not comfortable with that idea. (I still chuckle to myself as I recall watching him ponder this)!

I thought I’d help him out, so slowly began to reach my hand out to him. He too reached out, to within about 8 inches of my hand, just briefly, then after a few seconds, quickly turned and trotted off about 20 feet and turned at about 45 degrees to me and stood casually looking at me for a bit.

I stayed seated on the log with my eyes mostly downcast but glancing up now and again. Suddenly he turned to face my way, from 20 feet out, square-on and let out the most powerful snort I have ever heard from any horse! I mean, like he put every ounce he had, into it I’m sure. Funny thing is, by this time I was so deep into this amazing encounter I didn’t even flinch, in spite of this sudden and powerful out-burst.

After standing looking right at me a bit with eyes wide and flared nostrils , he calmed down then quartered away, alternately cropping grass, glancing back and moving away till he disappeared over a hill some three hundred yards off. Finally Monty, I have come to my question! Did I miss my cue there? When he turned and moved away after sniffing my hand. Was it my turn to move towards him and I didn’t realize it?

Twenty-twenty hind-sight tells me he was enjoying this little game just as much as I was, and that, that was his invite for Join-Up? Also, what was that resounding snort? (Remember this came after the hand sniffing and retreat.) Was that perhaps a scare tactic, to see if I would take flight? Or, was he just (ha ha) voicing his disgust, at my lack of knowledge, of the rules-of-the-game!

A little background on the horse. He was in an area frequented by people on quads, dirt bikes and such, and so, used to seeing humans regularly, although never me, nor me him. Whether he had ever had contact with humans I do not know.

In closing I want to thank you Monty for sharing with the entire world, your vast knowledge of equine behavior and showing people how they can better interact with horses and other creatures, even humans. I have done some partially successful Join-Ups with some of our horses except for one docile little mutt who refuses to go into flight mode! So I want to study more of your lessons and put them into practice, therefor I intend to re-enroll, as soon as funds allow.

I apologize for such a lengthy story but, I was so fascinated, by this chance encounter, I just had to share, in hopes that other readers may find it interesting. I want to point out that the terrain we were in allowed me to keep some sort of obstacle; a tree, a stump, a fallen log, etc. between us, (just in case) at all times.
Although my Buddy showed no sign of aggression I thought it best to be careful. Thank you, and I do hope you will be able to find the time to respond. Sorry, I know you are a very busy man.

Sincerely,
Gerald Hoszouski, Alberta

Monty’s Answer

Dear Gerald,

Thank you for sharing the details of your encounter. You probably already know that my life has been filled with similar episodes. I have been able to write regarding about 10 percent of similar encounters. My life has been blessed with so many opportunities to communicate with the wild animals inhabiting this earth of ours.

There are so many educated people that have a hard enough time believing what I’ve been through as it is, I have never told the story about the dove on the fence of Flag Is Up Farms. I drove by in my pickup several times and realized that she just kept sitting there. I stopped, got out of my pickup, went to her and put my hand out.

I held my hand about six inches from her and watched as she elevated her wings and then just made a hop to sit on my finger. I had an employee in the pickup who was astonished by what he saw. Something had told me that this bird was ready to have a meeting with a human being. Nobody has to believe this but it’s true.

You had your encounter, nobody has to believe you either. Hold your memories as they belong simply to the two of you. I certainly can believe you, because I’ve had so many similar occasions. I will paraphrase how I see your episode taking shape and coming to a conclusion.

Let me suggest that there is a strong possibility that this horse was 11 or 12 years old and had been kicked out of his harem by a younger stallion. Let me say that it’s possible he was looking for some sort of meeting with another animal he thought he could trust. He wasn’t going to test the difficult terrain for that last few

inches, but as you suggest, he moved to a downwind position, this is not uncommon.

As the scent of your humanity drifted on the wind, let’s predict that it loaded up his olfactory plate. Let’s suggest that his mind was so preoccupied with you he suddenly realized he could no longer smell you. It was then that he blasted a huge volume of air across the plate to clear off the accumulated smells. He once again could identify odors with clarity, it was then that he probably decided not to take a chance on you.

Recently I had a similar letter from a man who took walks in the woods. This time it was a deer with the same sort of experience that you had with the horse. I suppose it’s fair to say that the closer I can bring people to the acceptable body positions the more of these kinds of experiences we will hear about. I would suggest traveling to the area as much as possible. You may even find another horse if your body positions are right.

Thank you so much for your inquiry. Savor this moment for the balance of your days. This horse will undoubtedly remember you. Remember, horses never forget anything, and I am sure this was a special moment in his life.
Sincerely,
Monty