Monty Roberts Announces Demonstration Dates 2016

January 31st, 2016

January 31, 2016 Solvang, California: Monty Roberts will tour the world in 2016, helping owners and horses face their fears and learn to trust each other.

March 5, 2016 English Tour: Hadlow College, Kent, UK
March 11, 2016 English Tour: Reaseheath College, Cheshire East, UK
March 19, 2016 English Tour: Kingston Maurward College with MARTIN CLUNES, Dorset

April 9, 2016 Demonstration in Vilhelmsborg, Denmark
April 24, 2016 German Tour: Zweibrücken, Germany
April 23, 2016 German Tour: Darmstadt, Germany
April 30, 2016 German Tour: Ohlstadt, Germany

May 5, 2016 Austrian Tour: Ebreichsdorf, Austria
May 7, 2016 Austrian Tour: Stadl-Paura, Austria
May 28–29, 2016 South African Tour: Johannesburg, South Africa

June 4–5, 2016 South African Tour: Cape Town, South Africa
July 17–21, 2016 Monty’s Special Training (translation in Portuguese), California, USA
August 1–5, 2016 Monty’s Special Training at Flag Is Up Farms, California, USA
August 22–September 2, 2016 Gentling Wild Horses course at Flag Is Up Farm, California, USA

Also
March 21–23, 2016 Monty Roberts Certified Instructor’s Meet-Up in England, UK

http://www.montyroberts.com/ab_about_monty_calendar/see-monty/

Email info@montyroberts.com or Call 805-688-6288

Interview with Monty Roberts and Chris Cox about the Road to the Horse

January 31st, 2016

January 31, 2016 Solvang, California: Horsemanship Radio announced that Monty Roberts and Chris Cox met recently in Brentwood, California after an interview which took place in January and is now being carried on the Horse Radio Network.

Monty Roberts is a life-long practitioner of gentle horse training and New York Times best-selling author of The Man Who Listens to Horses.

Chris Cox is a four time winner of the Road to the Horse competition held annually in Lexington Kentucky at the Alltech Arena. After a lifetime of horsemanship, Monty Roberts, Chris Cox and Road to the Horse judge Jack Brainard believe in sharing what the horses have taught them and are driven to impart their knowledge of the horse with the next generation.

The interview with Chris Cox, Monty Roberts and Jack Brainard can be found on the network directly: http://www.horsemanshipradio.com/2016/01/15/horsemanship-radio-episode-56-by-index-fund-advisors-ifa-com-monty-roberts-speaks-with-chris-cox-and-jack-brainard/

The Horsemanship Radio Show is an online radio show dedicated to the exploration of good horsemanship throughout the world. Recent guests have included a special interview with Bob Baffert who, after training three Kentucky Derby winners, finally captures the Triple Crown of Horse Racing with American Pharoah. Author and trainer Mitch Bornstein was another guest who tells his story of saving Samson, in his book Last Chance Mustang. And Lee & Hallie Hanssen shared how they train and show happy, healthy Barrel Racing Horses. Upcoming interviews include Ben Masters of the movie Unbranded.

Horsemanshipradio.com is the fastest growing program on the Horse Radio Network which dominates horse programming podcasting in the United States. A podcast is nothing more than a radio show online.  The advantage over regular radio is the many choices of how and when to listen to the shows.  With podcasts people can listen on the website using the players in each show listings or by downloading the free app and listen on their ’smart’ phones. The shows are found in iTunes for free. It is all about choices.  People listen while cleaning stalls, on a trail ride, or driving to a horse show. Glenn Hebert of Horse Radio Network has been pleased with the response the show is getting and produces and shares air time on the show as well as his wife and partner Jenn Hebert, long time horsewomen herself.

Title sponsored by Index Fund Advisors IFA.com with show sponsors OmegaFields.com and www.MontyRobertsUniversity.com and hosted by Debbie Roberts Loucks (Monty Roberts’ daughter) the show includes segments, tips and interviews exploring good horsemanship. Host Debbie Roberts Loucks said “We care about the future of horses and horsemanship. It’s our listeners who make that happen and we are having fun sharing what they find entertaining and helpful.” The shows are aired the 15th and 30th of every month and can be found here: www.HorsemanshipRadio.com  Or people can also search for the Horsemanship Radio on the Horse Radio Network here: http://www.horseradionetwork.com/ or download the app here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/horse-radio-network/id672259386?mt=8

People can find it free on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/horsemanship-radio-episodes/id657184487

And Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.horseradionetwork.hrn

Horse Sense For Leaders – Quick Read Edition

January 14th, 2016

Horse Sense For Leaders

 

Download the ‘Quick Read’ Edition of:
Horse Sense For Leaders: Building Trust Based Relationships

 

Monty Roberts and Flag Is Up Farms Celebrate 50 Years Together in 2016

December 31st, 2015

December 31, 2015 Solvang, California: January 9, 2016 will kick off the celebrations on Flag Is Up Farms in Solvang, California. Called The Night of Inspiration, Monty will demonstrate his signature Join-Up®, starting a horse to his first saddle and rider in about 30 minutes. His history of starting horses since he was a young person inspires people to develop their skills in building trust and communication between horse and human.

Flag Is Up Farms is the internationally renowned starting point for some of the world’s most successful performance horses and highest earning racehorses. It is also the home of the Monty Roberts International Learning Center and equine celebrity Shy Boy.

Monty and Pat Roberts, with their team of exceptional trainers have used force-free, Join-Up® training methods to start horses on their way to happy, healthy, and successful careers in a variety of disciplines and applications.

Remedial horses have found an environment among the team at Flag Is Up Farms that fosters a safe haven to mend troubling behaviors and get back on track for success.

Flag Is Up Farms’ notoriety as home to “The Man Who Listens to Horses,” Monty Roberts, has also created a demand to open the farm to the public.

Visitors are welcome from 9am to 5pm daily, with no fee or reservation required.
The farm and hacienda facilities which have been featured in Town & Country Magazine are also host to numerous corporate events throughout the year, offering an enriching and educational experience for your team.

Monty and Pat Roberts welcome you to learn more about the philosophies of Join-Up, violence free training and its many applications among the majestic landscape at Flag Is Up Farms. http://www.montyroberts.com/ab_about_monty/flag__intro/

November 30, 2015: Radiothon Features Trainer of American Pharoah, Bob Baffert, plus Monty Roberts and Charlotte Bredahl

November 30th, 2015
cyber monday
On Cyber Monday, November 30, the Horse Radio Network will give away over $3,000 in prizes, live on the HRN Holiday Radiothon, the Network’s first annual Holiday Radiothon to air on “Cyber Monday.” The premiere streaming event, sponsored by WeatherBeeta, runs from 9:00 am to 9:00 pm (ET), and features over $3,000 in prize giveaways to listeners.

Don’t miss the 1pm Eastern time hour when Horsemanship Radio’s segment of the Radiothon will air the interview with Bob Baffert who trained four Kentucky Derby winners, six Preakness Stakes winners, and two each Belmont Stakes and Kentucky Oaks winners. This year, Bob and American Pharoah won the 141st Kentucky Derby, bringing his total number of victories in the Derby to four. American Pharoah is one of the leading contenders for Sports Illustrated’s 2015 Sportsman of the Year because there was no other display of sportsmanship in 2015 that came close to what owner Ahmed Zayat and Bob Baffert did with American Pharoah. You can vote here: http://www.si.com/sportsmanofyear/2015/11/10/vote-si-sportsman-poll 

Top equestrian companies have lined up to offer their goods & services for HRN fans. Prizes from companies including: WeatherBeeta, Benefab, Sore-No-More, Dublin, Total Saddle Fit, Horse and Hunk Calendars, Cavallo Boots, Boy-O-Boy Bridleworks, Smooth Stride Jeans, Monty Roberts Equus Online University, EzSignsOnline.com, Distance Depot, Riders Sleeves, Gloria Austin, Mary Kitzmiller, Absorbine, and more.
 
ENTER TO WIN:

Throughout the show, prizes will be given away every hour, with a grand prize announced at the end of the show. Listeners can enter to win prizes in one of two ways: log on to the HRN Holiday Radiothon website before November 27, 2015 and leave a message on the Horseloverz.com Voicemail with a holiday message of your choice. http://radiothon.horseradionetwork.com/category/leave-holiday-voicemail/  or call in to the live show between 9 am and 9 pm eastern time, and tell us about your favorite holiday memory 
(435) 272-1997.
 
Charlotte Bredahl-Baker is a well-known trainer and FEI judge who was born and raised in Denmark before moving to the United States at the age of 22. She has an impressive list of accolades, including a team bronze medal from the 1992 Olympic Games with Monsieur and a Team Silver medal from the 1997 North American Championship with Lugano. Additionally Charlotte is the Assistant Dressage Youth Coach to the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF). http://bredahldressage.com/charlotte.html 
 
Monty Roberts first gained widespread fame with the release of his 1996 New York Times Best Selling book, The Man Who Listens To Horses; a chronicle of his life and development of his non-violent horse training methods called Join-Up®. Monty grew up on a working horse farm as a firsthand witness to traditional, often violent methods of horse training and breaking the spirit with an abusive hand. Rejecting that, he went on to win nine world’s championships in the show ring. Today, Monty’s goal is to share his message that “Violence is never the answer.” Roberts has been encouraged by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II with the award of the Membership in The Royal Victorian Order, as well as becoming Patron of Join-Up International. Other honors received were the ASPCA “Founders” award and the MSPCA George T. Angell Humanitarian Award. Monty is credited with launching the first of its kind Equus Online University; an interactive online lesson site that is the definitive learning tool for violence-free training. www.MontyRobertsUniversity.com/library 
 

News: Monty and The Queen

October 25th, 2015

At age 80, Monty Roberts hardly seems to be slowing down. The horseman extraordinaire continues to share his whispering wisdom around the globe, and yesterday, the renowned horse trainer was at Buckingham Palace with his old friend, Queen Elizabeth II. To read on, go to: http://www.horsecollaborative.com/monty-roberts-and-the-queen-bffs/

monty_queen

 

 

 

 

Leadership Lessons From Horses

July 29th, 2015

Solvang, California, July 29, 2015 – Register for the upcoming Horse Sense for Leaders Workshop to be held at famous Flag Is Up Farms in Solvang, California on November 6, 2015. The workshop will offer leaders new perspectives in leading others with a trust- based approach. It will focus on the new book Horse Sense For Leaders: Building Trust- Based Relationships. Leaders will complete an online assessment to find out how trustworthy they are. At the workshop leaders will experience the sights and sounds of a working horse farm and experience Join-Up®, Monty Roberts’ signature training approach.
 
Monty Roberts is the New York Times best selling author of the Man Who Listens to Horses. He developed the now famous horse gentling process, called Join-Up. Join-Up allows a horse to receive its first saddle and rider in 35 minutes or under without the anxiety, pain, or confusion of traditional training methods. Leaders will learn how to build trust, and how to promote a trust-based culture in their organizations.
 
To learn more about the event visit,
http://www.montyroberts.com/ab_about_monty_calendar/corporate-events-and-leadership-courses-3/

To register for the event visit, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/horse-sense-for-leaders-building-trust-based-relationships-workshop-tickets-17868355733 or contact Adam Bates at admin@montyroberts.com or Dr. Susan Cain at scain@corplearning.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wild at Heart Women’s Weekend at Flag Is Up Farms

July 29th, 2015
wild-at-heart
 
Solvang, California, July 29, 2015- Women from all over the globe will be converging on famous Flag Is Up Farms for the weekend November 7-8, 2015. The event is called Wild at Heart and will provide women from all walks of life with fun, rewarding, and personal development. Women will explore their own passions and interests with world famous sculptress and Award-Winning Horse back rider, Pat Roberts. Imagine spending a weekend on a working horse farm with other women who have similar interests.
 
The agenda is packed with fun and interactive events and will include a tour of the farm, art lessons with Pat, wine tasting and local foods tastings, and even a horseback riding lesson that focuses on eliminating your fears while riding. Participants will also take the Riding Styles Assessment and receive free copies of the book Horse Sense for Leaders.
 
“We are excited to offer this jam-packed weekend and look forward to meeting women who want to venture out and experience the incredible scenery, soak up positive messages, and experience a woman-lead weekend of November 7-8, 2015. Guests will be treated to dinner at Pat’s famous home high atop the hills overlooking the horse farm. The workshop location in located in the middle of wine country in the Santa Ynez Valley.
 
 
To learn more about the event visit,
 
For additional support contact Adam Bates at admin@montyroberts.com or Dr. Susan Cain at scain@corplearning.com 
 

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and Her Corgis

July 13th, 2015

Michael Joseph Gross reveals the private history of Her Majesty’s kennels and the essential role the pups have played in her reign.

Click here to read on: http://www.vanityfair.com/style/2015/07/queen-elizabeth-corgis-a-history

corgis

 

Monty Makes It Right

July 7th, 2015

Last week, Monty replied to a question in his Question and Answer column, and he believes he fell short of the mark. He would like to make it right today, with additional thoughts.

The original Question and Answer:

Question:
Writing to pick your brain as I’m sure through your experience and travels you have come across a horse like mine. His name is Royal. He is a 6-year-old Canadian gelding. I acquired him through the OSPCA so I don’t have much background info on him. All I know is that he was seized from his previous owner because they neglected him and he was extremely emaciated. He is now healthy and happy. Great guy, great ground manners, leads well, lifts feet, good to groom, stands in cross ties. Lunges off line well and really pays attention to his handler.
 
The problem I’m facing with him is that when any type of tack (saddle pad or saddle) is introduced to him, he steps 10 feet back. He’s extremely fearful, nervous to the point he starts to shake. With some persuasion, I can put the saddle pad on and off on and off, then the saddle. We haven’t worked up to doing the girth up on the saddle yet but I had a anti cast roller laying around so I figured well, this I won’t get to do up tight to secure it, there are no flaps to scare the poor boy. So again with some convincing, I was able to put it on and off, on and off. Then I was able to do up the girth. Once anything is on him, he is reluctant to move. I let him take his time to take this new piece of tack into stride. He stood still for the longest time, then all of a sudden he exploded. Running around that round pen as fast as he could, bucking for a bit but not big bucks, just as if he was trying to kicking at his belly to get the darn thing off. He then stops and starts to shake and just stands there, will not move. I enter the round pen, and encourage him to move with the anti cast roller still on him, he runs around and at one point does a nice little trot. So we end things on a good note, I remove the tack, give him a treat and back to his pasture he goes.
 
A couple days later, I repeat the above but get the same initial reaction as if he’s never seen it before. This goes one now for five sessions. I have tried Googling a solution to this problem but have come up empty handed. My question to you is how do I allow him to accept this tack without being so nervous that he wants to crawl out of his skin?
 
Thank you for your time,
Chantal B.
Ontario, Canada
 
Monty’s First Answer:
Dear Chantal,
 
Quite possibly to your surprise I have met Royal, at every city I have ever traveled to throughout my career. I say this to you because everything you told me about Royal verifies that he is normal. Whatever made you think that horses want something on their back and a belt around their girth? They have 50 million years in their DNA telling them that this is probably a lion or a tiger. This is an normal response.
 
Please let me inform you that everything I have ever written videoed or created as a lesson for my Online University addresses these issues directly or indirectly. Please do not fall into the trap of expecting knowledge about horse behavior to fall out of the sky and land in your lap, clearly understood. These issues need to be studied, learned and correctly acted upon. My entire life has been devoted to better understanding the behavioral patterns of Equus.
 
It worries me that you have undertaken these early training efforts with what seems to be no idea as to how the horses brain works. Please heed my words that horses can be dangerous with no intention of creating harm. In the end when horse cause injuries, they get the blame even when they are acting completely normal. Please hear my warnings.
 
No one can blame you for using whatever methods you thought might be acceptable but it is my message to the horse world that one can be blamed for acting without seeking the knowledge necessary to execute training procedures with no attempt to gather the information necessary to execute in a safe manner. It is not fair to your horse or anyone else to fall short allowing the horse to take the blame.

Monty’s additional words to the reader who asked about her cinchy/girthy horse:

Dear Chantal,

It is true that I find myself often saying that my critics are my best friends. They keep me getting up in the morning, and learning to be a better horseperson as well as a better role model for horse people. Recently I personally answered a question of yours. For good or for bad, I personally answer every question on the Ask Monty newsletter. It has been brought to my attention that there have been five negative responses to my answer regarding your horse and his sensitivity to the girth area. If we were in a court of law, I might hear the judge say that the charges are that you failed to answer the question, talked down to the person asking for your help and spoke to her in a demeaning fashion. My plea would have to be GUILTY. 

At this point in time I have had the question and answer read to me three different times. I failed to fully explain my recommendations for dealing with sensitivity to the nerve endings in the girth area. I used language that would indicate that you knew less than you should have known when in actual fact that is exactly why you were inquiring of me. I would like to make several excuses for why I believe that my answer was curt and short of the mark. The fact is that there can be no excuses for this inappropriate communication. I should know that better than anyone in the horse business as it is my mantra that communication is the center of all understanding where dealing with the needs of your horse is concerned. 

Recognizing that there could easily be many people who may have wanted to criticize my answer, I am now communicating through this open letter back to the Ask Monty forum so that those who may have questioned my answer can see that I am trying to be the best source of information that I can, and doing it with understanding and compassion for those who seek information from me. I answer was not good enough by any measure, and I will attempt, herein, to put it right once and for all. If you are a regular reader of Ask Monty do not hesitate to speak your mind whenever you feel the need to. Remember that I appreciate compliments as much as I appreciate the criticisms that cause me to be a better person. 

While I sincerely believe that I spoke the truth without deliberately meaning to demean, criticize or evade my reader, I failed to completely edify the questioning party as to my recommendations for successful problem solving the problem that she sought to put right. Girth-bound (cinch-bound or girth sensitivity) is a global phenomenon that exists in virtually every horse to one extent or another. Most horses can deal with this problem with two or three saddlings. It is true in this case that we have a condition which appears to have become chronic. Often times we hear these horses referred to as girth-bound or cinch-bound horses. This long lasting phenomenon must be carefully dealt with as it can be extremely dangerous. 

There is no question that while I did mention my Online University as being a source of information about the malady of the girth bound syndrome, I failed to point out that there was a whole chapter on it in, From My Hands To Yours the only textbook I have ever written. While these answers are meant to be shorter than the chapter of a book, I will now take the time to give the salient points of that chapter. I recommend the use of a stable rug or stable blanket to reduce sensitivity and then to use what we call an overgirth or thin elastic strap that can go over the stable rug and around the horse in the area of the girth. This should be tightened gradually, over about a 20-minute period of time. 

With the overgirth in place, the horse should be allowed to remain in a box stall (loose box) for about another half hour or so with the elastic band fairly tight. After that, I recommend that the handler should place a normal surcingle over the rug being sure that there is elastic in the girth. This surcingle should be equipped with a breastcollar (breastgirth) so that it will not slide back from the girth area. Once again the handler should tighten the girth gradually over 10 or 15 minutes until it approximates the tension of a normal saddle girth. After that, the horse should spend another 20 minutes or so with the surcingle in place. With these procedures complete the horse is ready for the saddle.

One should remember that these procedures are time approximate and the handler should be aware of the horse’s overall behavior and only move forward with these efforts as the horse has settled into a mindset of acceptance. The extreme case could require as much as 50% more time than I have outlined in this scenario. Removing the surcingle and placing the saddle should be done smoothly but in the shortest amount of time possible. The saddle girth should be tightened incrementally over 10 minutes or so. As the days go by, these times can easily be shortened until eventually the horse can be fully saddled in about 20 minutes or so. Once more I stress; read your horse. 

Do not at any time attempt to mount your horse until you determine that there is a calm, cool acceptance level. I recommend releasing the horse in a small area (50 foot round pen or so) or a small corral 30–50 feet square. It is advisable to see the horse canter with a cool demeanor before mounting. I recommend schooling your horse to come to the mounting block as is shown in my Online University. In doing so, the handler can read the acceptance of the horse, particularly when making the side pass movements when approaching the mounting block. I believe this to be the safest set of procedures to follow when dealing with the behavioral pattern that I came to envision while reading your initial question. 

Please accept my profound apology for an answer that was short of the one given here. With the encouragement of the criticisms that I received I intend to redouble my efforts to be as fair as I possibly can with anyone seeking my advice. I note with interest that the criticisms came from others and not from yourself. While I appreciate your patience with me, I also appreciate those that would stand up for your right to have a more complete answer than the one I gave you. I will continue to do my work in the knowledge that it is important and profound both for horses and those who love them. Please remember that it is my life’s goal to leave the world a better place than I found it for horses and for people, too.

~ Monty

Do you have a question for Monty? Email it to: askmonty@montyroberts.com